Teacher

Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation: A Simple Guide to Schools in Africa


Climate change education provides an important window into individual and societal responsibility. As educators, schools not only have an interest in teaching subjects that will prepare students for careers and earn them good test scores, but to teach them to be mindful and responsible citizens. Teaching on climate change means teaching on topics like environmental stewardship and collective responsibility — teaching students that they and those around them have a responsibility to something larger than themselves. Real climate change education confers onto students an appreciation of the role they play in their environment — both their physical, changing environment, and their civic environments. Incorporating the topic into school curriculum only stands to bring students closer to their communities. Civic engagement, one of the most important lessons schools impart on their students, can be taught through student engagement with local institutions.

With the curricula as hectic as they are, and such a breadth of material to cover, UNESCO has compiled a small volume giving reference to Africa: Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Simple Guide to Schools in Africa which will be used in the STEM mentorship Camps for secondary schools to support efforts by educational institutions to impart knowledge on climate change to students in secondary level education.

To read more: Click here 



5 Strategies For Better Teacher Professional Development


Just as a teacher has to create conditions that support and encourage student success, school districts have to support teachers professional development. 

Today, professional development runs the gamut from one-shot workshops to more intensive job-embedded professional development, which has teachers learn in the day-to-day environment in which they work rather than getting pulled out to attend an outside training.

However, the National School Boards Association’s Center for Public Education report, “Teaching the Teachers” noted that most professional development today is ineffective because it neither changes teaching practices nor improves student learning.

To read more, click here

Source: TeachThought



Flipping Lesson Design: Moving The Learning Objective To The End


There would be few teachers haven’t been advised to publish lesson objectives at the beginning of every lesson.

After all, this is a signal for students where the learning is going, and can help keep teachers and students on the same page. But for many teachers, this has largely been an ineffective strategy, with students just mindlessly writing them down and rarely independently checking their learning against them as the lesson unfolds.

John Dabell succinctly articulates a possible reason: It could be argued, that we need to accomplish the learning first before we can understand what the learning objective is and what the knowledge and understanding relates to. Many teachers concur, and after years of adhering to the expectation of writing down learning objectives (Los) at the start of lessons, at the beginning of the year, maybe this is a chance to try something different.

 

To read more, click here 



5 Out-Of-The Box Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know


Most teachers and current textbooks offer varied approaches to the material to be learned so the teaching can be brain-compatible with the varied student learning styles.

It is only logical that respect for these individual learning styles be incorporated into assessment forms and out-of-the-box assessment strategies teachers should know and use when appropriate. For example, teachers responsive to interpersonal learning styles find cooperative group work a way to pull in those learners as well to give students with artistic, computer, dramatic, or organizational skills the opportunities to enter the learning experience through their strengths and interests

To read more, click here 



20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers


Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer times than students working individually.  Why is this so?

Groups tend to learn through “discussion, clarification of ideas, and evaluation of other’s ideas.” Perhaps information that is discussed is retained in long-term memory. Research suggests that students who worked collaboratively on math computational problems earned significantly higher scores than those who worked alone. Plus, students who demonstrated lower levels of achievement improved when working in diverse groups.

What are some ways to include best practices for collaborative learning in the classroom?



20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers


Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer times than students working individually.  Why is this so?

Groups tend to learn through “discussion, clarification of ideas, and evaluation of other’s ideas.” Perhaps information that is discussed is retained in long-term memory. Research suggests that students who worked collaboratively on math computational problems earned significantly higher scores than those who worked alone. Plus, students who demonstrated lower levels of achievement improved when working in diverse groups.

What are some ways to include best practices for collaborative learning in the classroom?

To read more, click here 

Source: TeachThought 

 



‘Growth mindset’ in education: Great new tool or overrated fad?


“Growth mindset” theory in education proposes that minds are malleable: teachers can improve students’ "intelligence, ability and performance" by encouraging them to believe their learning abilities aren’t fixed, but are capable of growth. The theory is popular in education circles.

Firsthand teacher accounts show dramatic learning improvements attributed to growth mindset. It also has its detractors. At least one well-designed study found little evidence the theory really does work in practice. Who’s right? Learn more...

Source : Multi Briefs



‘Growth mindset’ in education: Great new tool or overrated fad?

‘Growth mindset’ in education: Great new tool or overrated fad?

“Growth mindset” theory in education proposes that minds are malleable: teachers can improve students’ "intelligence, ability and performance" by encouraging them to believe their learning abilities aren’t fixed, but are capable of growth. The theory is popular in education circles.

Firsthand teacher accounts show dramatic learning improvements attributed to growth mindset. It also has its detractors. At least one well-designed study found little evidence the theory really does work in practice. Who’s right? Learn more...

Source : Multi Briefs



Tone In Teaching: 20 Words That Can Change How Students Think


While I often talk about scale as one of the primary challenges in education–and have also wondered about curriculum, too–a more subversive concept constantly at play throughout education is tone.

As an ‘English’ teacher, I always explained tone to students as a kind of  ‘attitude’ that can be expressed in a variety of implicit and explicit ways–from words (said and unsaid) and body language to voice tone, timing, irony, and any other modality used to communicate ideas.

Tone affects how students see themselves and their role in the learning process. In fact, a student’s own ongoing internal dialogue and thoughts about themselves and their self-identity as learners isn’t just a ‘factor’ in learning but one of the single most important factors.

To read more, click here.

Source: TeachThought 



Educating for the Social, the Emotional and the Sustainable

 Global Education Monitoring Report

Earlier this year, the UN Secretary-General reported that “the shift in development pathways to generate the transformation required to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) by 2030 is not yet advancing at the speed or scale required.” He noted with regret that “…the most vulnerable countries are bearing the brunt of the current obstacles to SDG implementation…. The bleak situation of countries in situations of conflict or fragility is all the more troubling given that, by 2030, more than half the world’s poor are projected to live in countries affected by conflict.” 

This blog looks at a new publication by NISSEM on the challenges facing poorly resourced or conflict-affected countries in addressing SDG Target 4.7. It argues that addressing this target can help change long-term behaviour to help achieve the SDGs. Learn more...

 

Source: World Education Blog



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